Back

Special Message on mental illness and mental retardation, 5 February 1963

Special Message on mental illness and mental retardation, 5 February 1963
Feb 5, 1963
28 digital pages
This folder contains materials collected by the office of President John F. Kennedy's secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, concerning legislative activities and efforts to enact the Kennedy Administration's legislative program. Items include press releases of President Kennedy's Special Message to Congress on mental illness and mental retardation delivered from the White House Fish Room. In his speech the President discusses his plans for a national mental health program legislation, which proposes comprehensive community mental health centers, improved care in state mental institutions, and increased research. To combat mental retardation, he recommends emphasizing preventative lifestyle measures, improved community services, increased research, and comprehensive maternity and child health care assistance programs.
04.
  • Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963
  • President (1961-1963 : Kennedy). Office of the Personal Secretary. , 1961 - 1963
JFKPOF-052-012
Papers of John F. Kennedy. Presidential Papers. President's Office Files. Legislative Files. Special Message on mental illness and mental retardation, 5 February 1963
The Legislative Files series was constructed by the staff of the Kennedy Library from a four-box nucleus of a "Legislation" series, a partial box of "Messages to Congress," and documents dealing with legislation from the subjects part of an old "Special Topics" series and from the disbanded "Daily Reports." What has emerged is a very incomplete, fragmentary file of reports and memoranda which at least partially documents the highlights of the efforts of the White House staff to get the administration's legislative program enacted. The series includes notes for meetings with Congressmen, summary reports on the progress of legislation, messages to Congress, memoranda about specific pieces of legislation and the interests and concerns of individual Congressmen, and lists of Congressmen attending bill signings and social events at the White House. Since much of this material covers more than one piece of legislation, it has been arranged chronologically rather than topically. This arrangement was also selected to afford researchers an overview of concurrent White House interests in many legislative activities. To assist researchers in locating information on a particular legislator or on a particular piece of legislation, the folder title list is supplemented by the names of Congressmen mentioned and topics covered in the documents (less the summary reports) in each folder. This series, being so fragmentary, requires researchers to consult other series, collections and subcollections for a fuller account. Researchers will be especially interested in the White House Staff Files of Lawrence O'Brien, Myer Feldman, and Lee White.
Some of the archival materials in this collection may be subject to copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Users of these materials are advised to determine the copyright status of any document from which they wish to publish.
Documents in this collection that were prepared by officials of the United States as part of their official duties are in the public domain. Some of the archival materials in this collection may be subject to copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Users of these materials are advised to determine the copyright status of any document from which they wish to publish. The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excesses of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. The copyright law extends its protection to unpublished works from the moment of creation in a tangible form.