PX 86-8 Dillon (crop): C. Douglas Dillon, Secretary of the Treasury (1961-1965), undated

Disregarding party lines, President Kennedy appointed Republican Clarence Douglas Dillon Secretary of the Treasury in 1961. Mr. Dillon worked closely with the Bureau of the Budget and the Council of Economic Advisors, and sought to foster economic growth through domestic tax cuts and international trade. Regarded as one of President Kennedy’s most influential economic advisors, Mr. Dillon was also involved in the creation of the Alliance for Progress and helped promote the anti-tariff Trade Expansion Act of 1962. He also participated in the secret ExComm meetings during the Cuban missile crisis. Mr. Dillon remained secretary of the treasury for the first sixteen months of the Johnson Administration, before leaving government service to resume his position as president and director of the United States and Foreign Securities Corporation and the United States and International Securities Corporation.

 

 

1909 August 21, Born, Geneva, Switzerland

1931 B.A., Harvard University

1932-1936 New York Stock Exchange

1936-1937 Director of the United States and Foreign Securities Corporation and the International Securities Corporation

1938 Vice President and Director, Dillon, Read and Co. investment firm

1941-1946 Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy

1946 Director of the United States and Foreign Securities Corporation and the International Securities Corporation

1953-1957 United States Ambassador to France

1958-1959 Undersecretary of State for Economic Affairs

1959-1961 Undersecretary of State

1961-1965 Secretary of the Treasury

1965 Resumes as Director of the United States and Foreign Security Corporation and the International Security Corporation

1968-1982 President, Board of Overseers at Harvard College

1970-1976 Chairman, Brookings Institution

1972-1975 Chairman, Rockefeller Foundation

1978-1983 Chairman, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City

1989 Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom

2003 January 10, Died

See also

Archives and Manuscripts
Oral History Project