JFKPOF-036-012-p0047: Private First Class Dwight H. Findley, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA, 11 November 1961

1961

Military Construction Authorization
H.R. 5000 — Public Law 87-57, approved June 27, 1961
This measure provides construction and other related authority for the Department of Defense, within and outside the United States, and authority for construction of facilities for the Reserve components, in the total amount of $893,947,750. 

Military Procurement Authorization
S. 1852 — Public Law 87-53, approved June 21, 1961
This measure authorizes $12,571 million for the procurement of aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels for fiscal 1962. The specific types of aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels to be procured are not designated in the bill in order to provide the Defense Department with more flexibility in this program. In the event of reprogramming, however, the Department will notify the Committees on Armed Services and Appropriations before implementing the proposed changes.

Military Procurement Authorizations - Additional
S. 2311 — Public Law 87-118, approved August 3, 1961
Authorized additional appropriations, as requested by the President on July 26, 1961, to provide for additional equipment primarily to improve the non-nuclear defense capabilities of our ground forces and of the Navy and Air Force; to provide increased air and sea lift; and to expand our antisubmarine warfare program. The overall request for additional authorizations for the procurement of weapons, equipment, and ammunition was for $1,753 million; however, of this amount additional authorizations are required only for $958,570,000.

Navy Diving Duty Pay
H.R. 4323 — Public Law 87-145, approve August 17, 1961
This bill repeals existing law authorizing various forms of pay for personnel engaged in diving duty and established a maximum rate of $110 a month as special pay for military personnel performing diving duty. Under this bill, the Secretary of the Navy will establish a flat rate of $110 for all officers performing diving duty and a scale of from $55 to $100 a month for enlisted personnel depending upon skill and experience. At present, there are three separate types of pay now authorized for persons performing diving duty which will be repealed by this act. 

Ready Reservists
Senate Joint Resolution 120 — Public Law 87-117, approve August 1, 1961
Authorizes the President to order up to 250,000 ready reservists to active duty for not longer than 12 months; part of the increased strength needed will be accomplished by added inductions, additional enlistments, and increased officer procurement. The President can also extend terms of enlistments and appointments where there might be a shortage of trained personnel in areas of critical need in the foreseeable future. The forces called will be those necessary to build up a balanced fighting unit; priority will be for persons who have not previously fought a war or served long periods of active duty and those whose occupation is not essential to maintain the national health, safety, or interest.

Reemployment Rights - UMT
H.R. 8765 — Public Law 87-391, approved October 4, 1961
Amends the reemployment provisions of the Universal Military Training and Service Act to-

Reinforce the reemployment protection of those who perform additional military service under present conditions (250,000 reservists ordered to active duty under Public Law 87-117 of August 1, 1961).

Remove a requirement that rejecters must request a leave of absence from their employer to determine their physical fitness to enter the Armed Forces.

Assure those who are called for pre-induction examinations and subsequently accepted or rejected are entitled to remain in their employment pending their induction or rejection.

Reserves - Participation
H.R. 5490 — Public Law 87-378, approved October 4, 1961
Provides more flexible regulations regarding terms of enlistment in the National Guard to make service in that unit more attractive; as the law now stands, service is either for 1 or 3 years.

Other changes include making ROTC graduate training program run from 3 to 6 months at the discretion of the service Secretary in place of the required 6 month active duty requirement. Also includes penalty provisions for those who fail to actively participate during term of service in either the Active Reserve or the National Guard. 

Service - Alien Enlistment
H.R. 181 — Public Law 87-143, approved August 17, 1961
This measure authorizes peacetime enlistments in the Army and the Air Force by persons who have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence.

Under existing law, in peacetime a person may not be accepted for original enlistment unless he is a citizen of the United States or has made a legal declaration of intention to become a citizen; however, section 4(a) of the Universal Military Training and Service Act provides for registration and induction into the Army Forces of male aliens under certain conditions. Many of these aliens, after serving a part of their military obligation, would like to enlist and make a career in military service but, because of assignment overseas or other circumstances, they are unable to comply with the requirement that an alien must make a legal declaration of intention to become a citizen of the United States before he may be accepted for enlistment.

Thus, this bill eliminates the requirement that an alien must have made a legal declaration of his intention to become a citizen of the United States before he is eligible to enlist in the Army or the Air Force. And, in the future, the Army and the Air Force will permit persons to enlist who can furnish proof of lawful admission to the United States for permanent residence.

1962

Berlin Resolution
House Concurrent Resolution 570 — Senate adopted October 10; House, October 5, 1962
Expressed the sense of Congress that:

The continued exercise of United States, British, and French rights in Berlin constitutes a fundamental political and moral determination;

The United States would regard as intolerable any violation by the Soviet Union directly or through others of those rights in Berlin, including the right of ingress and egress;

The United States is determined to prevent by whatever means may be necessary, including the use of arms, any violation of those rights by the Soviet Union directly or through others, and to fulfill our commitment to the people of Berlin with respect to their resolve for freedom. 

Civil Defense Emergency Authority - Extension
H.R. 11743 — Public Law 87-501, approved June 27, 1962
Extends to June 30, 1966 the provision of title III of the Civil Defense Act which authorizes the President to declare a national emergency for civil defense purposes and to assume emergency powers during such an emergency.

Bill now provides that an emergency may be proclaimed by the President or by concurrent resolution of Congress if either finds that an attack upon the United States has occurred or is anticipated. Emergency can be ended by the same process. 

Cuban Resolution
Senate Joint Resolution 230 — Public Law 87-733, approve October 3, 1962
Approved a joint resolution on Cuba stating the United States will use force if necessary to halt the spread of communism in this hemisphere.

Purpose of the resolution is to provide a means of expressing national unity regarding U.S. policies toward Cuba. To this end, the resolution declared the United States was determined-

To prevent by whatever means necessary, including use of arms, the Marxist-Leninist regime in Cuba from extending, by force or the threat of force, its aggressive or subversive activities to any part of this hemisphere;

To prevent in Cuba the creation or use of an externally supported military capability endangering the security of the United States; and

To work with the Organization of American States and with freedom-loving Cubans to support the aspirations of the Cuban people for self-determination.

The reason for the resolution is contained in the following statement made by President Kennedy on September 13, 1962:

There has been a great deal of talk on the situation in Cuba in recent days, both in the Communist camp and in our own, and I would like to take this opportunity to set the matter in perspective.

In the first place it is Mr. Castro and his supporters who are in trouble. In the last year his regime has been increasingly isolated from this hemisphere. His name no longer inspires the same fear or following in other Latin American countries.

He has been condemned by the OAS (Organization of American States), excluded from the Inter-American Defense Board, and kept out of the Free Trade Association. By his own monumental economic mismanagement, supplemented by our refusal to trade with him, his economy has crumbled and his pledges for economic progress have been discarded.

Along with his pledges for political freedom his industries are stagnating, his harvests are declining, his own followers are beginning to see that their revolution has been betrayed. So it is not surprising that in a frantic effort to bolster his regime he should try to arouse the Cuban people by charges of an imminent American invasion and commit himself still further to a Soviet takeover in the hope of preventing his own collapse.

Ever since communism moved into Cuba in 1958, Soviet technical and military personnel have moved steadily onto the island in increasing numbers at the invitation of the Cuban Government.

Now that movement has been increased. It is under our most careful surveillance.

But I will repeat the conclusion that I reported last week: That these new shipments do not constitute a serious threat to any other part of this hemisphere.

If the United States ever should find it necessary to take military action against communism in Cuba, all of Castro's Communist-supplied weapons and technicians will not change the result or significantly extend the time required to achieve that result.

However, unilateral military intervention on the part of the United States cannot currently be either required or justified, and it is regrettable that loose talk about such action in this country might serve to give a thin color of legitimacy to the Communist pretense that such a threat exists.

But let me make this clear once again. If at any time the Communist buildup in Cuba were to endanger or interfere with our security in any way, including our base at Guantanamo, our passage to the Panama Canal, our missile and space activities in Cape Kennedy, or the lives of American citizens in this country, or if Cuba should ever attempt to export its aggressive purposes by force or the threat of force against any nation in this hemisphere or become an offensive military base of significant capacity for the Soviet Union, then this country will do whatever must be done to protect its own security and that of its allies.

We shall be alert to and fully capable of dealing swiftly with any such development. As President and Commander in Chief, I have full authority now to take such action. And I have asked the Congress to authorize me to call up Reserve Forces should this, or any other crisis, make it necessary.

In the meantime, we intend to do everything within our power to prevent such a threat from coming into existence.

Our friends in Latin America must realize the consequences such developments hold out for their own peace and freedom, and we shall be making further proposals to them.

Our friends in NATO must realize the implications of their ships engaging in the Cuban trade. We shall continue to work with Cuban refugee leaders who are dedicated as we are to that nation's future return to freedom.

We shall continue to keep the American people and the Congress fully informed. We shall increase our surveillance of the whole Caribbean area. We shall neither initiate nor permit aggression in this hemisphere.

Resolution is consistent with this statement and is designed to reinforce it so that there can be no doubt as to the fundamental policy of the United States and as to the determination of the American Government to pursue this policy.

Military Construction Authorization for 1963
H.R. 11131 — Public Law 87-554, approved July 27, 1962
Authorized $1.4 billion in the current fiscal year for construction of missile bases, barracks, and other military facilities.

More than half the total is for the Air Force, which is allotted $743,379,000. The Navy is authorized to spend $213,688,000 and the Army $148,442,000. The Defense Department receives $33,650,000. The measure also allots $15 million to each of the three military departments for emergency construction.

Authorized $263,983,500 to cover construction of 13,892 housing units. The bill includes $46,500,000 for Reserve Forces and $6,030,000 to make up deficiencies in funds for previously authorized construction.

Military Procurement Authorization for 1963
H.R. 9751 — Public Law 87-436, approved April 27, 1962
Authorized $12,969,300,000 for military procurement. The table below shows the 1962 authorization, the administration request, the House-passed figures, the Senate-passed figures which became public law, and the differences indicated in the last column.

 

Fiscal year 1962 

Requested, fiscal year 1963

 H.R. 9751 as refered 


H.R. 9751 as reported

Committee recommendations
compared to DOD request 

Aircraft:   Army

 $247,000

 $218,500,000

$273,790,000 

$218,500,000

---

  Navy and 
 Marine Corps 

 1,867,000,000

 2,134,600,000

 2,134,600,000


2,134,600,000

---

                 Air Force

 4,135,300,000

 3,135,000,000

 3,626,000,000

3,626,000,000

---


 

 

 


+$491,000,000

Missiles:   Army

584,570,000

558,300,000

589,482,000

558,300,000

---

                 Navy

868,600,000

930,400,000

930,400,000

960,400,000

---

                 Marine Corps

27,000,000

22,300,000

22,300,000

22,300,000

---

                 Air Force

2,800,800,000

2,500,000,000

2,510,000,000

2,500,000,000

---

Naval vessels:   Navy

2,998,600,000

2,982,000,000

2,979,200,000

2,979,200,000

---






-2,800,000

Total:

13,529,570,000

12,481,100,000

13,065,772,000

12,969,300,000

+488,200,000

The administration had requested an authorization of $12,481,100,000 and the House increased the request to $13,065,772,000. The $491 million added by the House and Senate is to be spent on production planning and long leadtime procurement for an RS-70 weapons system. The Senate added language requiring that the $491 million be available only for the RS-70 weapons system.

Both the House and Senate deleted an item of $2,800,000 to fund the defense characteristics that will be incorporated in the construction of merchant ships. The authorization for this item exists in section 1159 of title 46, United States Code, which provides that the Maritime Commission pay for the cost of national defense features incorporated in such vessels.

The Senate deleted the following funds added by the House: $55,290,000 for additional Army aircraft; $31,182,000 for additional Army missiles; and $10 million for additional Air Force missiles.

The Senate bill contains an amendment to Public Law 86-149, the Military Construction Authorization Act of 1959 (which required authorization of appropriations for the research, development, or procurement of the RS-70 weapons system after December 31, 1961), to require authorization of appropriations for the research, development, test, or evaluation of aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels, effective at the beginning of fiscal 1964.

The Senate, at the request of the Defense Department, removed a restriction on the use of $525 million which was included in the 1962 military procurement authorization and limited to the procurement of long-range manned aircraft (B-52's). Since the executive branch does not intend to procure additional B-52's at this time, removing this limitation will free these funds for other areas.  

Quarters Allowances Increase for Military
H.R. 11221 — Public Law 87-531, approved July 10, 1962
Amended the Career Compensation Act to increase the basic quarters allowance for military career people (from E-4 to O-10; that is, corporal to general) in order to meet the increased cost of housing in the civilian market; and

Increased housing allowance for dependents of temporary military personnel and those below E-4 under the Dependents Assistance Act of 1950.

Purpose of the first provision is to bring the quality of housing for career military people into line with that afforded civilians of roughly the same income level. At present, some 61 percent of these personnel live in non-governmental housing. Increases under this section would range from 17.5 percent for a general to 66 percent for a master sergeant.

The second provision would upgrade amount of aid (for housing) to dependents of temporary or lower grade personnel an average of 7 percent. This aid goes to the dependents, not to the military man involved, although he must make the allotment from his own pay.

Last increase for either program came in 1952 when Congress made a flat 14 percent increase in both. Flat increases were rejected this time, and a civilian cost concept was used to arrive at a graduated scale which would allegedly reflect reality more accurately.

Changes in the Career Compensation Act become effective January 1, 1963. 

Ready Reservists - Standby Authority
Senate Joint Resolution 224 — Public Law 87-736, approve October 3, 1962
Congress unanimously approved standby authority until February 28, 1963, for the President to-

Recall up to 150,000 members of the Ready Reserve to active duty for not more than 12 months.

Extend enlistments, appointments, periods of active duty, or obligated periods of training, service, or status for not more than 12 months.

This authority was requested by the President in the following letter:

THE WHITE HOUSE Washington, D.C.
September 7, 1962.

Hon. LYNDON B. JOHNSON,
President of the Senate,
Washington, D.C.

Dear Mr. President: I transmit herewith a draft of a proposed bill to authorize the President to order units and members in the Ready Reserve to active duty for not more than 12 months, and for other purposes.

In my judgment this renewed authorization is necessary to permit prompt and effective responses, as necessary, to challenges which may be presented in any part of the free world, and I hope that the Congress will give its prompt support to this authorization, as it did, so effectively, a year ago.
Sincerely,

JOHN F. KENNEDY

In some respects the authority contained in the resolution is similar to that in Senate Joint resolution 120 of the 87th Congress, which became Public Law 87-117. The principal differences in the authority itself are that the authority extends only until February 28, 1963, and that the number of reservists who may be recalled is only 150,000.

The resolution of 1961 was intended to meet the Berlin crisis. The current resolution is not designed to meet a single threat, but it is inspired by the realization that the interests of the United States and the free world are threatened in many areas such as Berlin, Cuba, and southeast Asia. Another important difference is that there are no immediate plans to use the authority contained in this resolution. The strength of the active duty forces has been substantially increased since 1961. For example, the number of combat divisions in the Army has been increased from 11 to 16, or by 45 percent. Despite the additions in the personnel and material readiness of the Armed Forces, the United States may be confronted with situations during the adjournment of Congress in which additional manpower would be needed quickly.

The President does have the authority to order members of the Ready Reserve to active duty involuntarily if he proclaimed a national emergency; however, a proclamation of national emergency would confer additional powers that are not now required. Participation by Congress in granting this authority demonstrates a solidarity and unity of determination by the executive and legislative branches to defend the vital interest of this Nation and the free world. Under this resolution not more than 150,000 members of the Ready Reserve can be involuntarily ordered to active duty and the authority will exist only until February 28, 1963; and the members of the Reserve who may be called can be required to serve not more than 12 months.

Renegotiation Act Extension
H.R. 12061 — Public Law 87-520, approved July 3, 1962
Extended to June 30, 1964, the Renegotiation Act of 1951. The act of 1951 authorized the Renegotiation Board to write new contract terms for Government contractors if it determined the existing contract results in excessive profits to them. The renegotiation procedure was first employed by the Government in World War II and has been used in its present form since the Korean War. 

Under the 1951 act a contractor can appeal a Renegotiation Board decision to the Tax Court. The 1962 act contains the Talmadge amendment permitting a contractor to appeal a Tax Court decision to the court of appeals. 

Reserves - Lump-Sum Payments
H.R. 8773 — Public Law 87-509, approved June 28, 1962
This bill is designed to improve the status of Reserve members on active duty and involuntarily released to inactive duty. The idea is to equalize treatment between Reserves and Regulars.

To do this the bill-
Increases the readjustment payment to 2 months' basic pay for each year of active duty for a Reserve member released after 5 years' active duty (existing law provides one-half of 1 month's basic pay).

Authorizes maximum readjustment of 2 years' basic pay or $15,000, whichever is less.

Denies any entitlement pay to Reserves released from active duty because of moral or professional dereliction.

Provides where a reservist has received his readjustment pay and subsequently found eligible for disability compensation by the VA, he can receive compensation by repaying three-fourths of the readjustment pay he received. (Existing law requires a reservist to choose between readjustment pay and disability compensation.)

Repeals the requirement that a Reserve officer on active duty and twice passed over for promotion must be given a board hearing before he can be released to inactive duty.

Repeals the requirement a reservist must elect between readjustment pay and breach-of-contract pay. (Only the Marine Corps has used contract authority for reservists to any extent.) It is contended, however, since breach-of-contract pay is compensation for the Government breaking a contract and readjustment pay is compensation for a delay in beginning a civilian occupation - these are not necessarily alternative forms of compensation.

Cost. - Department of Defense estimates the bill will cost about $8 million additional a year for each of the fiscal years 1962 through 1966.

Travel Expenses
H.R. 7723 — Public Law 87-500, approved June 27, 1962
Increased to $16 (now $12) a day the maximum per diem allowance in lieu of subsistence for members of the armed services.

Authorized reimbursement for actual expenses up to $30 a day where military personnel are required to travel on assignments involving personal expenditures well in excess of the allowable reimbursement rate. Reimbursement for actual expenses will be governed by regulations of the Secretary concerned.

1963

Air Force Personnel
H.R. 6681 — Public Law 88-63, approved July 17, 1963
Extends for 2 years, to June 30, 1965, present temporary authority for an additional 4,000 officers in the grade of lieutenant colonel in the Air Force.

Under the permanent provisions of existing law the Air Force is authorized for the active duty force approximately 10,825 officers in the grade of lieutenant colonel, based on its present total officer strength of 129,000. Temporary legislation has been in effect since September 1, 1961, authorizing an additional 4,000 officers for the lieutenant colonel grade, making a total of 14,825.

The need for extension of this authority is based on both the existing number of lieutenant colonels on active duty in the Air force and the anticipated requirements for this grade.

Alien Enlistment
H.R. 3005 — Public Law 88-236, approved December 23, 1963
Authorizes enlistments in the Reserves by persons who have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence.

Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range
H.R. 5222 — Public Law 88-119, approved September 6, 1963
This bill withdraws from the public domain 132,572 acres of land in Imperial County, Calif., and reserves this land for the continued use of the Department of the Navy as part of the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range.

Corregidor-Bataan Memorial Commission
H.R. 7044 — Public Law 88-240, approved December 23, 1963
Authorizes the appropriation of $1,500,000 to develop Corregidor Island in Manila Bay as a memorial site to the Philippine and American soldiers, sailors, and marines who lost their lives while serving in the Pacific area during World War II.

Draft Extension
H.R. 2438 — Public Law 88-2, approved March 28, 1963
Extended until July 1, 1967-
Authority to induct persons into the Armed Forces.

Authority to issue selective service calls for physicians and dentists.

Suspension of permanent limitations on the active duty strength of the Armed Forces.

Authority to pay quarters allowance to all enlisted members of the Armed Forces with dependents.

Authority for special pay to physicians, dentists, and veterinarians.

Land Withdrawal -
Aerial Gunnery Range
H.R. 4588 — Public Law 88-161, approved October 29, 1963
Permits withdrawal from the public domain 306,555 acres of land in San Bernardino County, Calif., and reserves them for the continued use of the Navy Department as the major part of the Mojave B Aerial Gunnery Range.

Military Construction Authorization
H.R. 6500 — Public Law 88-174, approved November 7, 1963
This measure provides construction and other related authority for the Department of Defense, within and outside the United States, and authority for construction of facilities for the Reserve components in the total amount of $1,642,253,380 for fiscal 1964.

Following is a breakdown of the authorizations:
New authorization:

 Title I, Army                                    
               $199,633,000
 Title II, Navy  $202,462,000
 Title III, Air Force  $488,367,000
 Title IV, Defense agencies  $24,403,000
 Title V, Housing  $685,312,000
 Subtotal  $1,600,177,000

Deficiency authorization:
 Title I, Army                                   
                    $3,209,000
 Title II, Navy  $87,000
 Title III, Air Force  $166,000
 Subtotal  $3,462,000

Title VII, Reserve components:
Army National Guard                        
                    $7,500,000
 Army Reserve  $4,700,000
 Naval and Marine Corps Reserve  $5,700,000
 Air National Guard  $15,970,380
 Air Force Reserve  $4,600,000
 Subtotal  $38,470,380

Deficiency authorizations:
 Army National Guard                      
                          $84,000
 Army Reserve  $60,000
 Subtotal  $144,000
                             
 Grand total of all authorities       
               $1,642,253,380

Military Pay Increase
H.R. 5555 — Public Law 88-132, approved October 2, 1963
Authorizes pay increases averaging 16 percent for military personnel with 2 years' or more service at a cost of $1.2 billion a year, effective October 1, 1963.

This bill, the largest pay bill in history and the first since 1958, provides increases ranging from $60 to 110 a month for officers. For enlisted personnel, the range is from $5 in the lowest rank to $120 for senior sergeants and Navy petty officers.

The largest total outlay for both officers and enlisted personnel is earmarked for those in the middle or hard-to-keep ranks. For example, captains and Navy lieutenants, corporals, and third-class petty officers will receive approximately $300 million, or about one-fourth of the total.

Only military personnel with at least 2 years in the service will benefit from the pay increases. Most of the $1.2 billion will be added to basic pay of the active duty forces, but the legislation also benefits reservists, military retirees, and widows.

In addition, it increases special pay awarded to doctors, establishes a "family separation" allowance, and institutes new pay for men subjected to hostile fire, revamps overseas pay, and ties future increases in retired pay to cost-of-living advances. When the basic pay boosts are added to other emoluments already authorized for military personnel, top pay in the Armed Forces will be $32,607, which will go to two of the members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; the remaining three each will receive $30,627. These totals include a special $4,000 allowance paid only to the five JCS members to ease the burden of additional expenses they encounter in their demanding assignments.

The basic monthly pay for all five of the top military leaders is boosted from $1,875 to $1,970. Each also receives a monthly quarters allowance of $201 and a monthly subsistence allowance of $47.88 as part of the total compensation.

The Coast Guard leader's base pay, along with that of other four-star officers who are not JCS members, is raised from $1,700 to $1,785 a month. Counting both pay and allowances, the total compensation of four-star aviators will be $28,587; other four-star officers, $26,707. The Armed Forces have only 35 four-star generals and admirals including the Joint Chiefs.

On a percentage basis, generals and admirals receive the smallest increase - about 5 percent.

The senior military medical officer will be the highest paid three-star officer in the Armed Forces - total pay and allowances will be $26,558, counting $4,200 in special medical pay. Military doctors currently receive an extra $100 or $150 a month during their first 6 years, $200 in the 6th to 10th years, and $250 after 10 years' service. The pay act boosts the latter amounts to $250 and $350. These payments are in addition to other pay and allowances.

Total compensation, with one exception, of other generals and admirals in one-, two-, and three-star ranks will range from $17,808 for a brigadier general to $23,868 for a three-star aviator; there are 105 three-star officers, 484 two-star, and 658 in the one-star pay category.

Total compensation for officers in the ranks of major through colonel will range from $11,000 to $17,556, excluding doctors but counting flight pay for aviators.

Total pay and allowances in the three junior officer grades range from $4,560 to $11,136, excluding doctors but counting flight pay.

Total compensation for a sergeant major or master chief petty officer will be about $7,632 with 20 years' service exclusive of any special pay to which the man may be entitled. Special pay is awarded for assignments to hazardous duty (such as flying), for "incentive" purposes to attract men into certain programs, and for demonstrated "proficiency" in technical and skilled fields. This bill provides that men performing multiple hazardous assignments can receive two hazardous-duty pays. Under existing law he was entitled to only one. This bill also creates a new, special pay for those exposed to "hostile fire" in the cold war. Both officers and enlisted men who qualify will receive an additional $55 a month.

Foreign duty pay for enlisted personnel is now an additional $8 to $22.50 a month depending on rank. This bill permits the Secretary of Defense to eliminate the payments from all but "hardship" type posts. However, to protect those already on duty in Alaska, Hawaii, or outside the United States, the law prescribes that men receiving foreign duty pay on September 30 will continue while they remain at their present post to receive their present basic plus overseas pay if the total is more than they would get in basic pay under the new pay scales.

The pay act establishes a new "family separation" allowance for members with dependents. Those whose assignments separate them from their families will receive an extra $30 a month and/or an additional quarters allowance. The $30 payment is designed to assist military wives in paying the added expense of hiring help to do the various "handyman" jobs normally performed by husbands. The added quarters payment goes to those who have to maintain both a home for their family and rent commercial quarters for themselves at stations where their families cannot accompany them. A member eligible for both payments is entitled to both.

Increases pensions of widows whose husbands have died or die on active duty or of service-connected causes after leaving the Armed Forces. Under a separate law - the Survivor Benefits Act - widows now receive monthly payments of $112 plus 12 percent of the basic pay to which their deceased husband would be entitled if still on active duty. The Survivor Act has just been amended by Congress to boost the $112 portion of the payment to $120. In conjunction with the pay bill, this means widows now will receive $120 plus 12 percent of the 1963 pay scales.

Retirees will receive a 5 percent cost-of-living increase, except those persons retired under the Career Compensation Act prior to June 1, 1958, may recompute their retired pay on the basis of the 1958 pay act or take the 5 percent increase whichever is greater.

The old and new basic pay rates for the Armed Forces are shown on the below chart. The upper line is the old rate; the lower line is the rate contained in this pay act.  Those with less than 2 years in uniform receive no increase in their basic pay.  The amounts shown on the chart do not include separate subsistence and quarters allowances or such various special pays as flight pay, incentive pay, doctor pay, etc.  Quarters allowances were boosted $285.7 million in January of 1963.  They range from $45 to $201 a month.  The chart shows only Army ranks, but the rates also apply to the equivalent ranks in the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard as well as the Coast and Geodetic Survey and Public Health Service.

 Grade

OFFICERS: Years of service and pay 

 2

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

26

30

 Joint Chiefs of Staff

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

$1,875
1,970

 4-star general

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

1,700
1,785

 3-star general

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

$1,500
1,575

1,500
1,575

 2-star general

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

----

----

----

$1,350
1,420

1,350
1,420

1,350
1,420

1-star general

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

1,175
1,235

1,175
1,235

1,175
1,235

Colonel

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

$840
925

$860
945

910
1,000

985
1,085

985
1,085

Lieutenant colonel

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

720
830

745
855

775
885

775
885

----

Major

----

----

----

----

----

----

$550
660

$570
690

$610
720

630
740

630
740

630
740

----

----

Captain

----

----

$415
520

$440
545

$460
565

$480
595

510
625

525
640

525
640

525
640

525
640

----

----

----

First lieutenant

$291
  375

$360
  450

370
465

380
475

380
475

380
475

380
475

380
475

----

----

----

----

-----

----

Second lieutenant

251
300

314
375

314
375

314
375

314
375

314
375

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----


Grade      
                           

WARRANT OFFICERS: Years of service and pay

 2

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

26

30

 W-4                    

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

----

$516
595

$528
615

  $543
635

   $575
685

   ----

 W-3

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

----

$441
505

458
520

470
540

487
560

----

----

 W-2

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

$355
425

$369
425

$381
440

393
455

406
470

417
485

----

----

----

 W-1

---- 

---- 

---- 

$299
345 

$313
360 

345
405

364
420

354
405

364
420

375
435

----

----

----

----


Grade    
 

ENLISTED PERSONNEL: Years of service and pay 

 2

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

26

30

Sergeant major

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

----

$700
455

$410
465

$420
475

$430
485

  $440
510

    ----

   ----

Master sergeant

----

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

$330
385

340
395

350
405

360
415

370
425

380
450

----

----

Sergeant. 1st class

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

---- 

----

300
335

310
350

325
360

340
370

350
375

350
400

----

----

Staff sergeant

---- 

---- 

---- 

$235
270

$245
280

$255
290

265
305

275
315

280
325

290
330

290
330

----

----

----

Sergeant

----

$180
220

$205
230

210
245

220
255

240
265

240
275

240
280

240
280

240
280

----

----

----

----

Corporal

$150
180

160
190

170
205

180
215

190
215

190
215

190
215

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

Private, 1st class

124
145

124
155

141
165

141
165

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

Private

108
120

105
120

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

Recruit

105
110

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

----

In signing the bill President Kennedy stated:

It gives me a good deal of pleasure to approve H.R. 5555, a bill to amend title 37, United States Code, to increase the rates of basic pay for members of the uniformed services, and for other purposes.

I want to commend the Members of Congress of the House and the Senate who worked so hard to pass this most essential bill.

In the last 3 years, I have had an opportunity to visit a good many military units of the Army, Air Force, and the Navy.  I have some idea of how fortunate we are to have their service at the disposal of the United States.  Every citizen of this country owes them a greater debt than they realize, that they are able in a very prosperous and peaceful country to live as secure as they do because of the dedicated service of so many hundreds and thousands of our fellow citizens who serve in this country and all around the globe.

One million Americas serve outside out borders, and I think that the peace of this world of ours and its security have depended in good measure upon the members of the military of the United States.  And while we are all necessarily and properly respectful and impressed with the constantly more powerful weapons which are being developed, I think it is important that we realize that it is the men who must manage them, control them, and have the will to direct them.

So I think this is a very important bill.  I think in some ways we are taking care of a matter which should press very heavily upon us.  I think there has been inadequate compensation.  I think that this bill will encourage, I hope, men to stay in the services, increase its professional quality, and, most importantly of all, to make it easier for them to sustain their families who must undergo considerable sacrifice themselves.

One of the features of the bill which I think is most impressive is that it provides for the first time significant increases in the cost of living which will be automatically translated into corresponding increases in retired pay.  The Coast Guard, the Coast and Geodetic Survey, and the Public Health Service which are covered by the bill also perform impressive public service.

Military Procurement
H.R. 2440 — Public Law 88-28, approved May 23, 1963
Authorized $15,314,291,000 during fiscal 1964 for procurement, research, development, test, and evaluation of aircraft, missiles, and naval vessels for the Armed Forces as follows:

 

 Requested,
fiscal year 1964

House 

Senate 

Conference 

Procurement: [thousands of dollars]
Aircraft: Army

 522,100

 522,100

 471,200

 503,600

 Navy and Marine Corps

 1,958,700

 1,958,700

 1,860,900

 1,938,700

 Air Force

 3,559,000

 3,559,000

 3,329,000

 3,448,600

Missiles:           Army

 580,700

 580,700

 550,700

 565,700

                        Navy    

1,107,300

1,107,300

1,095,100

1,107,300

                        Marine Corps

14,700

14,700

14,700

14,700

                        Air Force

2,177,000

2,177,000

2,101,200

2,177,000

Navy vessels:    Navy

2,310,000

2,444,000

2,159,600

2,159,600

Subtotal

12,229,500

12,363,500

11,552,400

11,915,200

Research, development, test, and evaluation:

Aircraft:          Army

82,148

82,148

79,748

79,748

                        Navy and Marine Corps

204,183

204,183

198,083

198,083

                        Air Force

322,986

686,686

676,986

676,986

Missiles:           Army

576,601

576,601

559,301

559,301

                        Navy and Marine Corps

590,133

590,133

572,433

572,433

                        Air Force

1,060,132

1,060,132

1,028,332

1,028,332

Naval vessels:    Navy

293,008

293,008

284,208

284,208

Subtotal

3,129,191

3,492,891

3,399,091

3,399,091

Total

15,358,691

15,856,391

14,951,491

15,314,291

Military Training
H.R. 6996 — Public Law 88-110, approved September 3, 1963
Permanently fixes 6 years of service for enlistees in Reserve program to fulfill their military obligations through a revision, consolidation, and extension of the laws under which the so-called 6 month training program and other special Reserve enlistment programs have been operated.

This bill simplifies the special enlistment programs by consolidating the authority for a single special enlistment program for all the Reserve components. It provides for the continuation of the so-called 6 month training program modified to permit its utilization by all the Reserve components and by providing a uniform Reserve obligation of 6 years. A minimum period of active duty for training of not less than 4 months will be required. Persons who volunteer may be given active duty for training of longer periods to qualify them in military specialties that are needed by their units. 

The following table gives the various methods of fulfilling the military obligation upon enactment of this measure:

 Major programs now in use
Age
Minimum active duty
Ready Reserve
Total, military service obligation
 Selective Service (voluntary or involuntary induction)
 181/2-26
 2 years
2 years
 6 years
 Enlistment in Active Forces:
   
 
      Army  17-34  3 years
1 year
 Do.
      Navy  17-31  do 2 years
 Do.
      Air Force
 17-28  4 years
1 year
 Do.
      Marine Corps
 17-28  3 years
2 years
 Do.
      Coast Guard
 17-26  4 years
1 year
 Do.
Non-prior-service Ready Reserve enlistment program: All Reserve components including National Guard
 17-26  4 plus months
Approximately 5 1/2 years
 Do.
 Other Ready Reserve enlistment programs:
   
 
      Army Reserve
 17-26  2 years
2 years
 Do.
      Naval Reserve
 17-31  do 3 years
 Do.

Military Travel
H.R. 4338 — Public Law 88-238, approved December 23, 1963
Authorizes reimbursement to a member of the uniformed services for travel performed by him or his dependents, or both, under orders directing him to make a change of station that are subsequently canceled, revoked, or modified.