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Subject files: Voting Rights Act, 1965: [Map of voting rights cases and activity]

Subject files: Voting Rights Act, 1965: [Map of voting rights cases and activity]
1965
1 digital page
2.
Marshall, Burke, 1922-2003
BMPP-061-015
This series consists of files kept by Burke Marshal during his tenure as General Counsel and Vice President at IBM. Correspondence files consist of personal correspondence and personal reading files spanning Marshall’s tenure at IBM, including materials brought from the Attorney General’s office, and the Covington and Burling law firm. Personal correspondence contains incoming and outgoing letters on broad topics. Personal reading files contain outgoing carbons sent by Burke Marshall as part of his official duties at IBM. A "Pending" file from 1965 documents the change from the Assistant Attorney General’s office to the law firm of Covington and Burling. Major topics include civil rights issues and activities, the selective service, and personnel issues. Types of documents include photographs, invitations, requests for autographs, recommendations for employment and admission to academic institutions, and thank-you notes. Subject Files focus on Marshall’s work on the National Advisory Committee for Selective Service (NACSS) and include correspondence, memoranda, notes, writings, reports, and publications. Other materials relate to civil-rights related legislation, including the Civil Rights Acts of 1966 and 1968 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, projects, issues, and organizations Marshall was involved in or affiliated with while working for IBM.
Some of the archival materials in this collection may be subject to copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Users of these materials are advised to determine the copyright status of any document from which they wish to publish.
Documents in this collection that were prepared by officials of the United States as part of their official duties are in the public domain. Some of the archival materials in this collection may be subject to copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Users of these materials are advised to determine the copyright status of any document from which they wish to publish. The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excesses of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. The copyright law extends its protection to unpublished works from the moment of creation in a tangible form.