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Item I: White's handwritten notes of 29 November 1963 interview with Jacqueline Kennedy

Item I: White's handwritten notes of 29 November 1963 interview with Jacqueline Kennedy
29 November 1963
17 digital pages
11.
White, Theodore H. (Theodore Harold), 1915-1986
THWPP-059-011
Theodore H. White Personal Papers. Camelot Documents. Item I: White's handwritten notes of 29 November 1963 interview with Jacqueline Kennedy. THWPP-059-011. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
The “Camelot Documents” were originally created for and relate to the preparation of Mr. White’s brief “Camelot” article “For President Kennedy: An Epilogue,” which was published in the December 6, 1963 issue of LIFE. The article was based on an interview he conducted with Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, at her home in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, on the night of November 29, 1963, one week after the assassination of her husband, President John F. Kennedy. The interview was the first of a very small number that Jacqueline Kennedy gave on the subject of President Kennedy’s death. The 1963 LIFE article represented the first use of the term “Camelot” in print and is attributed with having played a major role in establishing and fixing this image of the Kennedy Administration and period in the popular mind. Mr. White Donated this 34-page file, which he called the “Camelot Documents,” to the Kennedy Library in December 1969. In his deed of gift, he stipulated that it was to remain closed until one year after the death of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. She died on May 19, 1994.
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